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Rule of Law: George Washington, Nimrod, and Today

On April 10, 2019, Politico posted an article entitled “Trump’s ‘truly bizarre’ visit to Mt. Vernon.” The article recounted a visit on April 23, 2018, by the French and American Presidents to Mount Vernon, home of George Washington, the first President of the United States. According to Mount Vernon president and CEO Doug Bradburn, the […]

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Game Not Over: Flying Monkey Barr versus Dorothy Democrat

Remember the good old days of Matthew Whitaker? He does not seem so bad in retrospect. As it turns out, I was completely wrong about William Barr. I had written (The Mueller Report: Paula Duncan, William Barr, and the American People): We know how Paula Duncan reacted when she was exposed to the truth. What […]

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Demographics and Local History

Local historical societies and museums, like local schools, local libraries, and, indeed, local communities, depend on there being a sufficient population to survive and thrive. Obviously that is true but what is the situation today? The front-page above-the-fold headline in my paper this Easter Sunday is “Estimates Show Population Loss in NY.” The article amusingly […]

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Republicans: Mueller Report Confirms Putin Deserves Congressional Medal of Honor

In an unexpected development, Republicans today unequivocally declared that the Mueller report conclusively proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that Vladimir Putin deserves the Congressional Medal of Honor for service above and beyond the call of duty on behalf of the United States of America. The Mueller report documents Putin’s sustained, systematic, and comprehensive […]

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What’s New in Public History?

The National Council of Public History (NCPH) held its annual conference March 27-30 in Hartford. I was unable to attend that conference. Fortunately, the conference abstracts are posted to the NCPH website so it is possible to get a better sense of the presentations than from just knowing the titles and the presenters. It would […]

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Creating History Education Partnerships: Three Case Studies

From time to time, I have become aware of different history educations partnerships which have been created. These examples demonstrate what people at the grass roots level can accomplish. Two recent examples appeared in the newsletters of historical organizations which I receive. The third was via an email about attending a conference. Unfortunately I am […]

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If You Build It, Who Will Clean It? – Staffing Problems at NYSOPRHP

The annual Parks Advocacy Day was held in Albany on March 4. The program was created by Parks &Trails New York and Open Space Institute in collaboration with the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation. The afternoon of the advocacy day is dedicated to meeting with elected officials to present talking […]

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REDC Funding: NYSOPRHP

For the history community, one of the most important sources of REDC funding has been the New York State Office of Parks and Historic Preservation. The description of grants opportunities is provided here: The Environmental Protection Fund Grants Program (EPF) provides matching grants on a competitive basis for the acquisition, planning, and development of parks, […]

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