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Indians Owned Africans: How Do You Teach This History?

“You never saw such a people in your life. Their manners and action are wild in the extreme. They are in a perfect state of nature and would be a curiosity to any civilized man.” “At that time the Indians did not have anything but small farms, and of course the freedmen were reared among […]

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History Legislation Update

The State budget has been passed. There is light at the end of tunnel. The world is opening up. What better time to look at history-related legislation and see what has happened during the lost year! Below lower are various bills identified by their Senate number and a description. The major new one concerns the […]

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We the People Will Tell the Story Funding Act

We are a story-telling species. But what story should We the People tell? To create a national narrative for the 21st century is an awesome challenge, perhaps an impossible one given our divisions today. While few countries in the world have had one continuous form of government for 250 years, we are at a point […]

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The 250th Anniversary: A Commonwealth of Virginia Case Study

On January 30, 2021, the Virginia Consortium of Early Americanists held their seventh annual conference. I had never attended one before. I do receive the notices of the event and other history-related conferences in Virginia. While many of them seem interesting there is a cost factor in time and money given the other conferences I […]

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Biden Becomes America’s Second Indigenous President: Who Knew?

Joe Biden has become America’s second Indigenous President. John Kennedy was the first. Who knew? It turns out based on the definition of “Indigenous” as an academic construct both the Irish and the Jews are Indigenous. No general, internationally accepted definition of indigenous peoples exists. It is typical of indigenous populations that they do not […]

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“Indigenous” versus “Indian”: What Word Should Be Used?

This blog is a continuation of a study deriving from an “Exchange” in the journal of the American Historical Association. The title of the Exchange is “Living with the Past: Thoughts on Community Collaboration and Difficult History in Native American and Indigenous Studies.” It consisted of a review of two books on King Philips War […]

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Violence and Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS)

This blog continues the examination of the American Historical Review (AHR) Exchange on the topic of historians and Native American and Indigenous Studies. The exchange began due to the coincidence of AHR receiving two related books: Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War by Lisa Brooks Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and […]

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Native American and Indigenous Studies: Another Culture Wars Episode

Earlier this year I became a member of the American Historical Association. I did so at the urging of a reader of my blog who is a member. After expressing some reluctance, I was finally persuaded to join. As part of the membership, I subsequently received The American Historical Review, the rather hefty journal of […]

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1827 Freedom Bicentennial Commission Covid-19 Casualty… This Year

Without the Covid-19 pandemic, there would have been an 1827 Freedom Bicentennial Commission passed this legislative session. The bill would have been passed by both the Senate and the Assembly. It would then have been sent to the Governor for signature. Between the summer and December, it would have remained on the Governor’s desk. At […]

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