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History Advocacy Advisory Alert

History Advocacy Advisory Alert The report on the Organization of American Historians conference is interrupted to bring you information about national history advocacy. The following notice was received from the American Association of State and Local History (AASLH) AASLH Conversations The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented crisis in our local communities, country, and world. […]

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Organization of American Historians Conference: II

This blog is a continuation of posts on the cancelled conference of the Organization of American Historians. For the first post go to The Organization of American Historians (OAH) Conference: What Would Have Been Presented? This blog focuses on the sessions related to American Indians as did the first one. There seem to have been […]

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The Organization of American Historians (OAH) Conference: What Would Have Been Presented?

Founded in 1907, the Organization of American Historians (OAH) is the largest professional society dedicated to the teaching and study of American history. The mission of the organization is to promote excellence in the scholarship, teaching, and presentation of American history, and to encourage wide discussion of historical questions and the equitable treatment of all […]

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We Are Not the UNITED States: Covid-19, Confederates, and the Union

We are not the UNITED States. We are the DISUNITED STATES. We were when we were constituted. We were when we fought the Civil War. We were when we celebrated the Civil War Sesquicentennial. And we are now as celebrate the American Revolution 250th. One can make the case that during World War II we […]

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Current Events and Local History

What is the purview of history museums? Some history organizations are event or person specific. Battlefields and homes are an example. Some organizations have the name of a municipality as part of the organization name. My position has been municipal societies have the responsibility to tell the story of where their area from the Ice […]

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Historic Site Visits: Tourists and Teachers (Part II)

This blog is a continuation of Historic Site Visits: Tourists and Teachers. In that post, I referred to a session at the annual conference of the American Historical Association (AHA) on What Should History Teachers Learn at Historic Sites? A Research Agenda. As a follow up to this session, I downloaded and read “Assessing the […]

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Historic Site Visits: Tourists and Teachers

In my last blog, I wrote about historic site visits as one of the sessions as the National Council on Public History (NCPH) Conference: Part II. I received a reply from John Marks, Senior Manager, Strategic Initiatives, American Association for State and Local History (AASLH): I just wanted to shoot you a quick message to […]

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National Council on Public History (NCPH) Conference: Part II

This blog highlights additional sessions at the NCPH conference that I would have attended if the conference had not been cancelled due to the coronavirus. Once again the blog is based on the online abstracts of the presenters (which not all conferences provide) and reflects my judgment of what may be of interest to the […]

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Sessions at the National Council on Public History (NCPH) Conference

This year for the first time I planned on attending the NCPH annual conference to be held in Atlanta, March 18-21. That conference along with many others has been cancelled due to the coronavirus. Instead of reporting then on what I observed at the conference, I will follow my custom of commenting on sessions based […]

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Do Monuments Matter?: A Monumental Question

On March 2, 2020, the Paul Mellon Lecture program “Reimagining the Role of Monuments in a Changing World” was presented by World Monuments Fund and the Museum of the City of New York. I was in Albany then for Parks Advocacy Day (which will the subject of a future blog) and was unable to attend […]

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