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If You Are a Native New Yorker, Are You a Native American?: The Weaponization of “Native” and the Culture Wars

This blog continues the discussion about Columbus Day versus Indigenous Peoples’ Day. It began when three states self-righteously “dumped” and “ditched” the former in favor of the latter (Columbus Day versus Indigenous Peoples’ Day: A Lose-Lose War). That blog was followed by an examination of the role of Columbus and Columbia in American history (Columbus […]

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Museum History: From Maine to the Met to the Erie Canal

Museums have a history, too. Museums today the repositories of historical artifacts available to scholars and the general public alike. However that was not always so. There is a history of how museums came to be what they are today. This topic was the subject of two presentations at conferences in June: “Entertainments at Taverns […]

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The American Revolution 250th: A Time to Heal or a Time to Divide?

Now that this year’s July 4th celebration is over, it is time to start looking ahead to the big one, July 4, 2026. That date marks the 250th anniversary of the declaring of the United States of America. It also is the bicentennial of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the second and […]

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Slavery Quadricentennial: The 400 Years of African-American History Commission

You may have missed this federal legislation so I am providing a streamlined version of it. The commission expires in 2020 with the scheduled production of a final report. H.R.1242 – 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act 115th Congress (2017-2018) Public Law No: 115-102 (01/08/2018) To establish the 400 Years of African-American History Commission, […]

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Columbus Day versus Indigenous Peoples’ Day: A Lose-Lose War

Columbus Day is in the news again. Given that it is months away, its appearance may seem surprising. However, in the ongoing culture wars, the battle continues throughout the year. The reason for the recent appearance of Columbus Day is due to its defeat in three states. According to a blog headline dated April 3, […]

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What’s New at the Organization of American Historians (OAH)

The Organization of American Historians (OAH) held its annual conference earlier this month. The OAH was founded in 1907and is the largest professional society dedicated to the teaching and study of American history. It represents more than 7,800 historians working in the U.S. and abroad. Its members include college and university professors, precollegiate teachers, archivists, […]

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